January 15th, 2005

Draconis Blackthorne, shadowgram, Dracomet

Not Like Most 15

Not Like Most #15

Arriving in the Hell Post, this gem of literary and artistic indulgence, filled with thought-provoking essays and multimedia reviews on a variety of subject matter of Satanic pertinence. First of all, one is gratified by the striking cover featuring Our Founder, rendered expertly by Artist, Agent Jack Malebranche - actually hand-painted on canvas {a sadly forgotten art; thus, the resurrection of a past orthodoxy}, which would look quite handsome in one's Parlor or Ritual Chamber - a fitting tribute to the legendary figure.

Inside, a scathing essay by Magister Paradise entitled "Consumer Vs. Producer", which really nails the differences between the two, even within our ranks; a very pleasing introductory column "Aesthetic Terrorism Series" with the infamous Magister Diabolos Rex, who lends his archetypal knowledge to The Devil's Gallery as well as countering many ignorant claims made by the herd; interviews with Unpop Art's Minister of Unpropaganda Brian Clarke, who speaks on this revolutionary movement which utilizes various historical imagery to invoke the darker side of the psyche, and forces the viewer to realize their own prejudices, regardless of how egalitarian or misanthropic they may claim to be; an interview with Jack Malebranche who discusses his art, homosexuality and libidonous projects; Magister Paradise offers another intriguing essay on "conditional love" vs. unconditional; Adan Flores explains the Third-Side perspective regarding cinemagraphic evilution; Colonel Akula ponders two of Our Satanic forebears in Nietzshe and Heidegger; and Reverend Herbert Paulis offers an amusing and incisive essay entitled "How I Became An Asshole" about the dangers of extending kindness to those undeserving and ingracious; I really enjoyed the section "Satanic Reflections From Bill Cosby", which through his humorous wit, rings all too true; and LeRue Delashay, our resident Composeur par excellance, literates the advent of Beethoven's iconoclastic influence into the modern world, which remains eternal.

It is surely a pleasure to absorb this latest release, which remains a superior Satanic publication throughout.

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